Yuru Cheng & Amy Chang Chien 「On Taking Gay Rights From Taipei to Beijing: Don’t Call It a ‘Movement’」

Posted on January 18, 2017
Lai Jeng-jer, a gay rights activist from Taiwan, at Two Cities, the cafe he opened after moving to Beijing in 2012. Before that, he had run a pioneering gay-themed bookstore in Taipei, Taiwan’s capital.
Credit Giulia Marchi for『The New York Times』

Taiwan moved one step closer last month to becoming the first place in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage, when a legislative committee passed draft changes to the island’s civil code.

The proposed amendments have been sent to party caucuses for negotiation and possibly further revision before a final version is approved outright or goes to a vote by the Legislative Yuan, a process that is expected to take months.

Still, the development was applauded by gay rights advocates, not just in Taiwan but in mainland China as well.

Among them was Lai Jeng-jer, a leading figure in the gay rights movement in Taiwan who now lives in Beijing. In 1999, Mr. Lai, who trained as an architect, opened Gin Gin in Taipei, Taiwan’s capital. It was billed as the first gay-themed bookstore in the Chinese-speaking world.

His mission was to create a space where sexual minorities could congregate openly and provide a platform to work for social change. In 2012, he moved to Beijing, where he and his business partner, Yeh Kenta, established what is now the Two Cities Cafe and Lounge. In an interview, Mr. Lai, 51, discussed the progress he had seen in gay rights, how Taipei differed from Beijing and how he dealt with the occasional visit by the Chinese police.

How do you feel about the passage of the same-sex marriage proposals in Taiwan?

Very happy. It was just drafts that were passed, and they still need to undergo a process of consultation among political parties and more readings, and we don’t know what the final outcome will be. But most of my friends are delighted because, after years of campaigning for this, there’s finally some progress.

Final passage would be a milestone. Some of my friends in mainland China have told me they might go to Taiwan. Up to now, if they wanted to get married, they had to go to the United States or Europe. I feel that the gay community in China has been greatly encouraged. Since we share a similar cultural background, they believe that if Taiwan can achieve this they can start to expect more for China.

You’ve long been part of the gay rights movement in Taiwan. How do you see it developing?

I’ve witnessed profound changes in Taiwan society since the lifting of martial law in the 1980s. I saw a lot of civic movements emerging and people taking to the streets to protest. I was quite young at the time and greatly inspired. I started to appreciate the significance of democratization.

Now, more and more people accept that, as a Taiwanese, it’s right to stand up for the underprivileged and the marginalized. Not just on same-sex marriage but on other issues, like environmental protection. Those who get involved are not always the ones directly affected, but they feel obligated to do something for those who are. That’s why, this time, we’ve also seen so many heterosexuals joining the demonstrations.

How have you adjusted to the move from Taipei to Beijing?

On Christmas Eve two years ago, we hosted a gay meet-up party at our cafe and invited about 20 people. In the middle of that, some police officers showed up and asked everyone to show their IDs. I was shocked, but our guests looked extremely calm. One after another, they took out their ID cards and showed them to the police. After the police finished checking them, they said fine and left. The party resumed, and our guests acted like nothing had happened. But I found it strange that they seemed so used to this kind of police intrusion.

Most of the people who come to our cafe are supportive. There are only a few who have objected. Once I saw a customer had commented on social media: “It turned out to be a gay bar. I won’t go there again.”

We’re not even a bar, let alone a gay bar. My colleague replied: “This is a cafe from Taiwan with a theme of cultural diversity. It’s not a gay bar, though we are in fact gay. Even if you don’t like this, please still show some respect.”

How would you compare the gay communities in Taiwan and in Beijing?

I have great admiration for any gay organizations that can survive in Beijing.

My cafe once hosted the Beijing Queer Film Festival. This is an international event that brings directors from all around the world. And when it comes to international events, there’s usually trouble. The police tend to interfere.

The Queer Film Festival has been held about a dozen times, and seven or eight times it’s been forced to shut down midway. Once they held it at Tsinghua University, and when the police came, even a top university like that had to compromise.

So when we held it, we couldn’t openly publicize it. What we did was send emails to people in which we didn’t mention what was happening. We just told them to come watch a movie on which day and at what time. It turned out that a lot of people showed up, and the police didn’t.

Some people joke about this situation. They say that in Taipei it’s called a “gay movement,” but in Beijing it’s “gay activities.” You can have all kinds of activities, but you can’t allow any of them to turn into a movement.

Still, it’s not that hard to live in Beijing as a homosexual, if all you want is a quiet life and you avoid participating in any movements. I’ve seen many lesbian couples kissing each other in the subway. Gays can also host parties at home. But you can’t get involved in any protests or demonstrations. Basically, if you keep a low profile, the authorities don’t interfere.

Do you know any gay couples in Beijing who want to get married?

I attended a wedding ceremony for a gay friend of mine. He’s the founder of Feizan, one of the biggest gay dating websites in China. He and his boyfriend sent us invitations for the event. But then he told guests that they should keep an eye out for a possible last-minute change of venue.

On the morning of the event, he telephoned that the site had changed. At noon he notified me that it was relocated again. That evening, they changed the site for the third time. Afterward, I learned that the police had called the first few places, which made them too scared to go through with it.

But finally there was a place near Ditan Park where they knew some people, and maybe because it was too late for the police to intervene, they succeeded in holding it. About 200 people attended. It was a very happy day.

Do you foresee the eventual legalization of same-sex marriage in mainland China?

It’s possible. But it’s hard to tell how long it might take. I’ve been living here for a while and can see the policy-making system in China is very different from what we have in Taiwan. Things can change very suddenly here. It might not take as long as in Taiwan.

This article was adapted from a feature that first appeared on the Chinese-language site of『The New York Times』.

Get news and analysis from Asia and around the world delivered to your inbox every day with the Today’s Headlines: Asian Morning newsletter. Sign up here.

Author: Yuru Cheng & Amy Chang Chien/Date: January 18, 2017/Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/18/world/asia/china-taiwan-same-sex-gay.html

Yuru Cheng & Amy Chang Chien 「台灣同志在北京:站在兩岸看同性婚姻合法化」


2016年12月26日,台灣同性婚姻合法化修法草案初審通過。修法草案的主要內容是將「同性婚姻由雙方當事人自行訂定」增訂在民法中。根據台灣法律,草案還需經過「朝野協商」和「三讀」等環節,對修法的具體細節進行商討才能正式生效。不過,在不久的將來,台灣有可能成為亞洲同性婚姻合法化的先驅。

同志運動人士普遍認為,如果最終修法成功,這將會給華人地區乃至亞洲各國的同志運動帶來巨大的鼓舞。身在北京的賴正哲也是其中之一。他說,得知這一消息非常欣慰,身邊的朋友也很開心,「有些大陸的朋友還說以後可能會去台灣結婚。」

賴正哲在北京雍和宮旁的方家胡同裡開了一間咖啡館,名叫「雙城咖啡」。平日裡,人們總能看到他親自在店裡忙進忙出。但很少有客人知道,賴正哲曾是台灣轟動一時的同志運動人士,也是華語地區第一家同志書店「晶晶書庫」的創辦人。

90年代末,建築系畢業的賴正哲曾在美國短暫居住。受到美國同志社區的啟發,回到台灣以後, 他於1999年成立了 「晶晶書庫」。晶晶的出現改善了台灣同志只能在夜間會面的尷尬境況,也成為最早把同志議題從角落裡搬到檯面上的力量之一。

晶晶的前衛作風也曾為賴正哲招致官司 。2003年,由於書店從香港購入男性裸體雜誌在店內銷售,賴正哲作為書店負責人曾因「妨害風化」被判拘役50天。在那時,同志群體仍常常被人和負面新聞聯繫在一起。但當賴正哲和他的支持者們在鏡頭前大膽地舉出「性權即人權」的標語時,他們挑戰了許多台灣民眾對於同志群體的成見。後來官司敗訴,賴正哲就此事向大法官提出了解釋相關法條的要求。大法官對此事的回應「釋字617號」被視為台灣法律對於出版物銷售管理方式的釐清。

同性婚姻修法草案首次進入立法院同樣也是受到個體事件的助推。10月,台灣大學法籍教師畢安生在其同性伴侶曾敬超病逝幾天後跳樓自殺。曾敬超去世前曾委託律師將財產及二人共同購置的房產留給愛侶養老。但他死後,由於二人的伴侶關係不受法律保護,畢安生沒能按照遺囑獲得財產和住房,而後在悲痛中自殺。這個故事迅速在社交網路上引發熱議。在社會的高度關注下,台灣立法委員尤美女等人將同性婚姻草案送入立法院。

紐約時報中文網在修法草案初審通過之際,在北京採訪了賴正哲。他因與合伙人產生理念糾紛,在2012年離開了晶晶,和友人葉子一起來到北京開了「雙城咖啡」。現在,他仍會偶爾在咖啡館舉辦一些同志主題的活動。在北京,截然不同的文化環境和偶爾來自上層的「問候」給他帶來了不少衝擊。

訪談經過編輯與刪減。

紐約時報中文網:12月26日民法修法草案的初審通過了,你怎麼看?身邊的朋友有什麼反應?

賴正哲:感覺很開心。不過因為這只是初審通過,還有「協商」、「三讀」,所以現在還不是很確定。最終結果沒出來之前很難說。身邊大部分朋友都很開心,因為終究也努力了這麼久,前前後後快十年,終於有一點結果出來。

北京這邊的許多朋友還特意傳了微信給我,也有人在微信公眾號發了新聞。我看他們的反應都是很期待,希望台灣能趕快通過(這項草案),這也是一個指標嘛。有些大陸的朋友還說以後可能會去台灣結婚。以前想結婚要去歐美國家,現在可以去台灣了。感覺大陸的同志群體也受到很大的鼓勵。因為大陸和台灣兩地在文化習慣上比較接近。他們說,如果台灣都可以通過,對中國就多了一些期待。

紐約時報中文網:你經歷過台灣同志平權運動歷史上的許多重要時刻,能否介紹一下台灣同志婚姻合法化的進程?

賴正哲:同志婚姻合法化這個話題,並不是近一兩年出現的,在台灣已經醞釀了五年以上。社會上有人會認為婚姻制度是件值得質疑的事。大家看到很多異性戀者離婚、選擇單身,為什麼同志還要進入婚姻制度?這樣的想法給公民團體「伴侶盟」(指台灣伴侶權益推動聯盟——編注 )帶來刺激,他們提出了「多元成家」的想法,包括三個法的草案:《婚姻平權》、《伴侶制度》與《家屬制度》。他們希望能將這個法案送進立法議程,過程中幾個立法委員也持續關心這個議題。最後他們提出的「婚姻平權」草案,比較接近這次修法關注的重點。其實原先的「伴侶制度」、「家屬制度」討論的範圍比這更廣,不僅局限於同志,還擴及兄弟姊妹、朋友的家屬關係。

這次修法的主要爭議在於要不要為同志「另立專法」(指為同志專門設立同性伴侶法,獨立於規範婚姻制度的民法之外——編注)。有些人認為另立專法是種歧視,應該直接將同志婚姻合法化修進原本的民法。許多台灣的政治人物認為我們可以借鑒外國經驗為同志另立專法。但如果這群人跟一般人都應該享有一樣正常的權利,為什麼要另立專法來給他們用?我自己的意見是,這是個歧視的法條。這法條只是適用於同志,異性戀者不適用,這就很怪了。

紐約時報中文網:看到這次修法引發的各種運動和討論,你的感受是什麼?

賴正哲:我們現在看到世界各國,有很多通過同性婚姻的國家,其實他們對同志也不友善,因為大家都一直很天真地認為,你只要通過了,世界就改變,其實沒那麼簡單。而且同志要解決的權利,其實也不只有婚姻,還有其他的。

畢安生老師跳樓自殺之後,很多人說:那老年同志咧?他年老了,他怎麼辦?社會有沒有看到他的需要?其他同志沒被看到的權利,誰為他們發聲?以後有人更可能會說,這個同志婚姻都通過了,你們還要求什麼?我認為,除了婚姻,還要在其他的面向再多努力,不能因此停下來。

八零年代時,我看到台灣因為解除戒嚴,整個社會完全變了。那時我感覺,台灣可以因為一個理想、或一個你願意實踐的事而改變。像是「美麗島事件」這樣的人權事件發生了,之後還「解嚴」,我看到好多公民運動冒出來,人們開始上街抗議、示威。那時我還年輕,我受到鼓舞,認為這是民主化的重要過程,而且我自己就是裡面的一份子,而不是別人,而正是因為那些過程,所以才會有今天的成果。

現在愈來愈多人覺得為弱勢、邊緣群體發聲,是身為台灣人應該有的基本sense(常識)。不僅是對同志婚姻,還有拆遷房屋、環保這些議題,發聲的可能不是跟議題相關的人,但他們覺得有義務站出來。也是因為這些原因,這次我們也看到這麼多異性戀者走上街頭。

紐約時報中文網:如果有一天台灣同性婚姻合法,你會希望步入婚姻嗎?

賴正哲:我有一個穩定交往的男朋友在台灣。如果他認為結婚對他來說是最重要的,我會為了他去做這件事。我並沒有多去說是一件多麼好的事情,因為還是有很多其他的面向要考慮,可是如果所有的資源、所有的力氣都花在婚姻上面,那其他的就看不到了。

「不要躲,要理直氣壯」

紐約時報中文網:晶晶書庫是亞洲第一家同志主題書店。開店的過程中有遇到過什麼困難嗎?

賴正哲:我的書店開在很多教堂聚集的地方,那條路被我們建築系的老師戲稱為「天堂之路」。我那家同志書店完全被教會包圍。一開始很緊張,不知道他們會不會來找麻煩。我設計書店的時候就想,我不要躲,我要理直氣壯,我就是要讓他們看到我們。所以我就在書店四周開了大片的玻璃窗,讓外面的人看得到裡面,裡面的人也看得到外面。後來我發現許多修女走到我們書店門口都要特別加快速度跑過去。可能她們很緊張吧。開了好幾年,周圍的人忍無可忍就去檢舉我。警察來看了看說,很OK啊,沒什麼問題,他就走了。

後來我又在同一條街上開了咖啡店和藝廊,三者的位置構成了一個三角形。二戰的時候,納粹特別在同志身上別了一個粉紅三角形,所以我就刻意去做了一個好大的旗子,把那個三角形就掛在我的三個點,整個撐起來,然後他們就覺得我太跋扈了,就會請小朋友來我門口塗鴉說:請你去相信上帝吧。

紐約時報中文網:在晶晶書庫的12年,什麼給你留下最深的印象?

賴正哲:我印象最深刻的是,那時我店剛開,有一個女生,她從一點就來書店逛。我書店很小,逛個半個鐘頭大概就逛完了,她從下午一點一直逛到四點,我發現有點不對勁,過去問她:「請問有什麼需要幫忙?」她就開始哭,一邊哭一邊說,她和一個男的在一起將近20年了,一直希望那個男的跟她結婚,可是沒想到男友跟她說:我真的不能再耽誤你,我要告訴你:我是個同性戀。

她講完以後說了一句話,我也哭了。她說她不怪那個男的,因為她真的很愛那個他,也謝謝那個男的沒有欺騙她,沒有跟她假結婚,因為那更慘。但她真的不了解什麼叫同性戀,那時候社會還比較保守。而且她從台灣南部特地來到台北找我的書店。我趕快把同志諮詢熱線介紹給她,我覺得她一定很無助,才會一直在書店不肯走。

紐約時報中文網:2012年離開晶晶之後,是什麼機緣讓你決定來北京開店?

賴正哲:那時晶晶的股東覺得我花了太多力氣在同志運動上面,希望我能更關心賺錢。我們理念越來越不合,後來我就離開了。那時我整個人很崩潰,覺得一起打官司、一起走過沒錢的日子、最後一起賺錢的夥伴,翻臉比翻書還快。我覺得沒有辦法待在台灣了。那時候有很多台商都來大陸做生意,我和合伙人葉子就想說,來北京看看好了。我們那時候知道北京有很多同志活動,比較有文化氣氛,語言也通,我又有一些開店的經驗,就決定來了。

紐約時報中文網:來北京開店順利嗎?

賴正哲:來咖啡館的客人和我們都是很相惜的。但也有人不接受。我曾見到有人上網評論說:原來這裡是一個gay bar(同志酒吧),我再也不會去了。但其實我們根本不是酒吧,更不是同志酒吧。我的同事就會回他說,我們不是gay的酒吧,我們是一個來自台灣的多元文化主題咖啡館。但我們本人的確是同志。如果你們不喜歡,還是請彼此尊重。

我們在店裡掛了一面反核的旗子,也有人因此給了我們一顆星差評,說你們服務態度很好,你們的咖啡都很好喝,但我不能接受你們掛反核的旗子。因為我是研究核料的,核料是可以被處理的,對人類不會有傷害。所以不單單是同志的問題,有時也有一些文化立場。

紐約時報中文網:除了一些顧客的不理解,雙城咖啡舉辦同志活動會受到阻力嗎?

賴正哲:前兩年的平安夜,雙城咖啡會舉辦同志交友活動,邀請了大概二十幾個同志朋友來彼此認識。我們安排了許多環節,氣氛還算熱烈。中間突然闖進來幾個警察,說「查身份證」。我當時很吃驚,但我的顧客全部都非常鎮定,一個一個地拿身份證出來給警察看。看過了之後警察說,沒事,就走了。我們的活動就照常進行,客人們無動於衷,好像什麼都沒發生過一樣。我覺得很奇怪,他們好像很習慣被突然檢查。但我很受傷,連續兩年的活動都被警察打斷,今年就不想辦了。

台北的運動,北京的活動

紐約時報中文網:你覺得作為一名同志,在北京和在台北生活有什麼不一樣?

賴正哲:在北京可能要更壓抑一些。很明顯,你只要去到台北的東區、西門町,就會看到「男男女女」——我指的是男跟男、女跟女——很自然地牽手、接吻,這邊比較少。另外一個很大的不同是,我在台灣從沒聽說過形婚和同妻。形婚就是拉拉和gay迫於壓力結婚,北京還會有形婚派對,這邊是拉拉,那邊是gay,然後看哪個拉拉和gay互相喜歡,就可以連線。

我現在來大陸幾年以後就能體會他們為什麼非結婚不可了。他們都因為家裡的原因沒辦法出櫃,不可以告訴父母自己是同志。父母逼迫他們結婚,那個壓力真的很大,左鄰右舍都會問,要抱孫子啦?台灣現在比較少有這種壓力,早期也一樣是這樣子。這種壓力讓拉拉和gay覺得,反正我們都需要婚姻,就假結婚吧。假結婚之後也會有很多麻煩,比如財產繼承,或者要不要生小孩,等等。他們還開玩笑說,要找拉拉也不找太「爺們」的,這樣一回去就破功了——根本就假的嘛!

紐約時報中文網:據你的了解,北京的同志團體和台灣有什麼不同?

賴正哲:我就講得比較白一點,在北京這邊的組織很多都會受到上層的打壓,所以他們要跟使館合作,尋求國際資助,視野也比較開闊。在台灣不是。在台灣都是如果要用錢就自己去跟個人或企業籌款,要表達意見就自己上街。相較之下,北京的公民意識還是比較低落,沒辦法遊行或集會。在台灣好像每個人什麼事都要去管一下。

北京的同志運動團體能生存下來都非常厲害,而且經營得還不錯。有時候我去拜訪他們,突然就能聽到警察敲門要臨檢。我就覺得很奇怪,我們又沒有在做什麼。警察可能聽說這裡是同志聚集的地方,有時候會有一些活動,所以就想來看看,看你們到底在幹嘛。我的那些朋友聽到敲門,連門都不開就說「誰?」、「幹嘛?」,他們已經練就了很自然而然的一套應對的方式。對方就隔著一道門說:「沒什麼事,門打開我再跟你講。」他們就問:「那你們有證件嗎?」對方說「有」,然後就把門打開,看一下證件,簡單交流幾句。這種時候沒有人會抬頭看警察一眼。之後警察就走了。因為這些事情,這種團體都經常要被迫搬家。不過現在好一些了。

我的咖啡館也承辦過一次酷兒影展。但因為酷兒影展是一個國際性的活動,會邀請世界各地的導演來北京討論。一牽扯到國際,事情就麻煩了。警察就會來阻止。酷兒影展至今辦了大概十幾屆,其中有七八屆都是中途被迫取消。甚至有一次他們辦在清華,都有人衝進去叫停,校方也就妥協了。我們辦的時候,都只能寄e-mail(郵件)到私人的郵箱,還不能提發生什麼事,就說幾月幾日在什麼地方請你來看一個電影。在微信微博都不能提這些事。結果那天我們來了很多人,警察也完全沒來阻止。

有些時候他們會開玩笑說,在台北是運動,在北京是活動。在這裡你可以辦各式各樣的活動,但不能成為運動。但其實作為一個同志,如果你只是安安靜靜地過自己的生活,不去參與運動,在北京的生活也沒有那麼困難。我看到過很多拉拉也在地鐵裡面接吻,有些男同志也會在自己家裡辦派對。但是你不能涉及抗議、示威、不滿什麼的。基本上只要你稍微低調一點,只關心自己的生活,上層也不太管你。

紐約時報中文網:在北京,你身邊有同志的朋友有結婚的願望?

賴正哲:我之前參加過一個同志伴侶的婚禮。是大陸最大的同志交友軟體飛站的站長和他的男友要結婚,就通知大家去參加他們的婚禮。我們就興高采烈地準備去。但他那時就留下伏筆說,請賓客在最後幾天多留意婚禮舉辦地點變更信息。

婚禮當天的早上,他打電話說地點變了。中午又打了一通,說又變了。臨近婚禮開始之前,到晚上,他們又換了場地,最後確定了地點。我們都急忙趕過去。後來才知道,前幾個地方都有警察打電話過去「關照」,於是都不敢接了。最後在地壇公園附近有一家酒店,有認識的朋友在那裡工作,告訴他們當天晚上剛好有場地空出來,叫他們趕快過去。因為時間太緊了,可能警察也來不及「關照」吧,就順利舉行了。當天婚禮有一兩百人參加,每個人都盛裝出席。婚禮的流程也是按照一般的,有主持人、證婚人一類的。那天很開心,真的很佩服他們。

紐約時報中文網:現在初審通過了,你周圍的朋友有沒有因此對中國未來可能將同性婚姻合法化增加了希望?

賴正哲:這個我還沒問過他們。不過只要繼續努力,樂觀一點,不要放棄,就會有所改變的。我覺得做運動的人就是要有這樣的態度。昨天有人在新聞下面留言說,大陸是最難通過的。然後就有人回復他說,還是要樂觀啊,不要放棄希望。

紐約時報中文網:你認為在中國,同性婚姻合法化是有可能的嗎?

賴正哲:我覺得有機會。但時間長短很難說。我在這裡生活了一段時間,我覺得中國的政策和體制跟台灣很不一樣,很多事情說變就變,說改就改,所以未必會像台灣那樣需要很漫長的時間。

Yuru Cheng是紐約時報中文網助理編輯。Amy Chang Chien是紐約時報中文網實習生。

Author: Yuru Cheng & Amy Chang Chien/Date: December 12, 2016/Source: https://cn.nytimes.com/china/20161229/taiwan-gayrights/zh-hant/


commentaires

上 TOP